Personality Tests


About Printable Tests




This website provides a collection of interactive personality tests with detailed results that can be taken for personal entertainment or to learn more about personality assessment. These tests range from very serious and widely used scientific instruments popular psychology to self produced quizzes. A special focus is given to the strengths, weaknesses and validity of the various systems.

Recommended test for scientific validity

Big Five Personality Test: The general consensus in academic psychology is that there are five fundamental personality traits. When it is said that there are five fundamental personality traits, it is meant that there are only five traits that are completely independent (knowing someones level of one trait gives you no information about their level on any of the others) and all other personality traits will be correlated with one or more of the big five. This test uses public domain scales from the International Personality Item Pool.

Recommended test for personal enjoyment

Open Extended Jungian Type Scales: The system of personality types proposed by Carl Jung (1921) and later refined by C. Myers and I. M. Briggs has become an extremely widely used personality theory in self-help, business management, counselling and spiritual development contexts, but it is not commonly used in academic research where, like all type theories, it is treated sceptically. The system produces 16 personality types on the basis of four dichotomies and is the system used in the Myers Briggs Type Indicator and Keirsey Temperament Sorter instruments, among many others. The OEJS is a free and open source measure of the four dichotomies which yields an equivalent result to the usual tests.

Other tests

Woodworth Psychoneurotic Inventory: Often cited as the first personality test, the WPI was developed by the United States military during World War I to screen for recruits at high risk of developing shell shock. Finished too late to be put to such use, the WPI instead found its place as the dominant self-report personality measure in academic psychological research during the 1920s and 30s, but has mostly been forgotten since then.

IIP RIASEC Markers: The Holland Codes (the acronym RIASEC refers to the six Holland Codes) is a typology of occupations that groups jobs into six categories and describes the different personality characteristics of people who are inclined towards each category. Since its developed by John L. Holland in the 1950s the theory has become dominant one in the field of career counselling and it has been incorporated into most of the assessment you might take at a university career planning centre. The RIASEC Markers from the public domain Interest Item Pool were developed by James Rounds and colleagues in 2008 for use in psychological research.

Short Dark Triad: The "dark triad" is a name for three personality traits that are commonly seem as malicious or evil: narcissism, machiavellianism and psychopathy. The study of these three traits together as the dark triad became popular in the 2000s. In 2011, Delroy Paulhus and Daniel Jones published the Short Dark Triad (SD3) as a single short test to measure all three traits at once.

Narcissistic Personality Inventory: The NPI is a measure of narcissism used in social psychological research. It is derived from the definition of narcissistic personality disorder, but measures subclinical levels of the trait and is not a diagnostic for NPD.

Artistic Preferences Scale: Rate paintings to find out what historical style of art your prefer.

Four Temperaments Test: If you had asked a well educated western person in 1850 to describe themselves, they would have responded using the language of the four temperaments, an extension of the ancient four humours theory of medicine to personality by Greek physician Galen (129–216 AD). The four temperaments as the accepted way to describe personality was vanquished by the development of psychology after 1900, but recently they have seen a resurgence and been promoted in spiritual and self-help contexts.

Cattell's 16 Personality Factors Test: In the 1940s Raymond Cattell proposed a model of human individual differences with 16 factors based on a statistical study of responses to personality questionnaires. Cattell's model has never been widely accepted and his statistical analysis that revealed 16 factors has never been successfully replicated, but the test he produced, the 16PF Questionnaire, has been very popular in applied psychology like contexts such as counselling and human resources. This test uses the public domain scales from the International Personality Item Pool that were developed by Lewis Goldberg to be equivalent to the 16PFQ.

Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale: Developed in the 1960s by Morris Rosenberg for a study of adolescent self image the RSES has become the most widely used general purpose measure of self esteem in psychological research.

Disclaimer

All of these tests are provided for educational and entertainment uses only. They are not clinically administered and as such the results are not suitable for basing important decisions off of. These tests are also not infallible, if the results say something about you that you don't think is true, you are right and it is wrong.