This is an combined version of Baron-Cohen's Empathizing Quotient (EQ) and Systemizing Quotient (SQ) tests.

Introduction
The empathizing–systemizing theory developed by autism researcher Simon Baron-Cohen proposes that on a level below normal personality there are individual differences in the wiring of the brain that result in two different modes a person may process information: empathizing and systemizing. The theory developed out of Baron-Cohen's work with autism where he hypothesized that the autism spectrum is an expression of extreme systemizing, he also adapted it into the extreme male brain theory of autism. E-S theory, particularly its connection to gender differences, is controversial.

The Systemizing Quotient (SQ) was developed by Baron-Cohen, Richler, Bisarya, Gurunathan, and Wheelwright (2003) and the Empathizing Quotient (EQ) was developed by Baron-Cohen and Wheelwright (2004) for use in research and to substantiate empathizing–systemizing theory.

Procedure
This test consists of 120 statements that you must rate on the scale of (1) strongly disagree (2) slightly disagree (3) slightly agree (4) strongly agree. It will take most people ten to twenty minutes to complete.

Participation
Your participation in this assessment in voluntary and should be strictly for educational purposes. It is not psychological advice of any kind. Your answers will be recorded and possibly used for research and/or otherwise distributed in an anonymous fashion.





Source:
  • "ARC Tests". Autism Research Centre. Accessed 1/20/2014.
             <http://www.autismresearchcentre.com/arc_tests>


  • References:
  • Baron-Cohen, S., Richler, J., Bisarya, D., Gurunathan, N., & Wheelwright, S. (2003). The systemizing quotient: An investigation of adults with Asperger Syndrome or high-functioning autism, and normal sex differences. In U. Frith & E. Hill (Eds.), Autism: Mind and brain (pp. 161–186). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Baron-Cohen, S., & Wheelwright, S. (2004). The Empathy Quotient (EQ): An investigation of adults with Asperger Syndrome and high-functioning autism, and normal sex differences. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 34, 163–175.
  • Simon Baron-Cohen (2003). "The Essential Difference". New York: Basic Books.